4 (but really 6) steps to creating a visual resume

This week in Professional Communication and Presentation, the focus is the visual resume, a project I developed several years ago after seeing my friend Christin’s Prezume. I am currently working on a revamp of mine to match the new teaching portfolio and teaching philosophy infographic I worked on last year and this year, and ran across this article from Ethos3’s Scott Schwertly titled “Four Steps to Creating a Visual Resume“. In it, Schwertly shares some tips (six in total) I will be sharing with my students tomorrow. Schwertly advises visual resume creators to remember the importance of that first slide; catching your audience’s attention with that first slide will help set you apart from the crowd and also provide sufficient visual stimulus that makes the audience want to know more. Empowered Presentations, a Honolulu-based presentation design firm tasks each of their associates with creating a visual resume that showcases the individual’s abilities and personality. The first slide of each EP visual resume establishes the tone and feel for the presentation and the presenter’s personality:

Another tip Schwertly shares with readers in this article is brand yourself. This to me is one of the most important lessons to learn about a strong visual resume (and a big area I’m working on in my new version). Consistency in design that communicates and conveys who you are to your audience is key to a strong visual resume. I love love love how David Crandall brands himself as the anti-cog superhero in his Anti-Resume Manifesto:

One final tip I’ll share with you from the article is “Ask for It.” A visual resume is your chance to let a prospective company or client know exactly why they should want to work with you. As Schwertly says, “you need to provide purpose and meaning behind your visual resume.” Not inviting the audience to contact you is akin to closing a presentation with “that’s it.” It simply tells the audience you’ve wasted their time and they can now go about doing something more important. Slideshare user Yuri Artibise ends his presentation with two simple ideas: 1. That’s my story; what’s yours and how can I help? and 2. Here’s how we can connect. This gives the presentation that sense of purpose it needs to propel it forward in the audience’s mind.

Have you built your visual resume yet? If not, Schwertly’s article is a great starting point. Check out the rest here!

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3 thoughts on “4 (but really 6) steps to creating a visual resume

  1. This is cool. Visual resumes are usually done really poorly. They’re a great addition to a LinkedIn account, so a hiring manager can get a grasp of your creativity. But mostly, they still need to see traditional ones. Here are 10 resume writing commandments: http://resumegenius.com/resume/resume-writing-commandments

    • Hey Pauline! I definitely agree. I always tell my students and colleagues to think of the visual resume as supplement, not replacement. While that hiring manager may be impressed by a well-executed visual resume, a human resources professional must process basic qualifications and experience quickly and that requires a traditional paper resume. Thanks for your input and the link!

  2. […] “4 (But Really 6) Steps To Creating A Visual Resume” gives us insight on how to develop a strong personal brand through a visual resume.  Not many people understand the point or the goal of a visual resume, so Chiara’s blog post is a must-read. […]

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