40 Days of Dating: Design and Life Intersect

I ran across the project, 40 Days of Dating after perusing the site of one of my followers. I ran across his interview with one of the creators and participants of this project, Jessica Walsh. Walsh is a talented designer whose work has earned her critical acclaim and big client (she redesigned the Adobe MAX logo with partner Stefan Sagmeister), but she’s also a self-proclaimed hopeless romantic who jumped into relationships head first, often to her own detriment. Her partner in crime for the project was Timothy Goodman, fellow designer and polar opposite in dating terms. Together, they engaged in a social and aesthetic experiment: what happens when two designers and relationship opposites date for 40 days? The couple was tasked with documenting each date on their blog. From day one, the blend of aesthetics/design and storytelling grabbed me. I read through all 40 days in an hour. I love the rawness of the story, the complete familiarity I felt as reading each post and studying each piece of artwork designed to accompany the post. Some have criticized the duo, claiming the experiment was a gimmick to land a movie deal (which just happened), but for me, the blend of visual and verbal storytelling was compelling and engaging. It’s something I’d like to implement in my own presentations for a few reasons:

1. Handmade design that aligns with and tells part of a story is immersive

Part of what drew me into the project was the visuals. Each image, photograph, video, or illustration perfectly aligned with the stories Jessica and Timothy told.

2. Storytelling transcends all media and forums

It doesn’t matter if you are an award-winning designer or a cat lady from Orlando,Fl, the experience of finding love for another and yourself is universal, and it’s universally interesting!

3. Perspective is everything!

What fascinated me most was how differently Jessica and Timothy viewed their daily experiences. It has made me even more mindful of just how much of our daily interactions are guided by our internal perspective engines.

Check out this intro video below and the rest of the blog 40 Days of Dating by following the link!

What do you think of the project? Gimmick? Design genius?

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4 thoughts on “40 Days of Dating: Design and Life Intersect

  1. Alex Rister says:

    This website is BEAUTIFUL! What a cool idea. The design makes the idea even cooler 🙂

  2. ipersuade says:

    What an amazing video. and your explanations on the video was insightful. thanks for sharing. I enjoyed reading your post

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