Tag Archives: professional

Tweak Your Teach: The Super Teacher Chronicles

Wow! It has been quite a while. Since beginning my new position with Valencia College and returning to school, I’ve been unable to blog. Then it occurred to me that I am still designing, still presenting, and still learning. So, why not share that with others? I may not post as often as I did in the past, but when I can, I will update the blog with any new teaching, speaking, or designing projects.

This week, I created a podcast series as part of my coursework for Distance Education: Process and Product. The series is called The Super Teacher Chronicles. I created this series to share some of the best practices and strategies I’ve been learning about as a tenure-track professor and student. The first episode is “I am a CAT person and You are Too!” CATs or Classroom Assessment Techniques are powerful tools for formative feedback and active learning. They take very little time to implement and can help you improve teaching and instruction.

Check out the cast below!

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Story differentiates your body of work

In today’s world of work, which is characterized by abundance, instability, and ingenuity, professionals have to find ways to differentiate themselves from the many others out there who possess the same or similar skills. How does one rise to the top of a mountain of great communicators, strong work ethics, and innovative, effective, responsible workers (these words all come from LinkedIn’s top ten most overused buzzwords of 2013)?

In oder to differentiate yourself and maximize your competitive advantage, you have to tell your story. Pamela Slim, author of Body of Work: Finding the thread that ties your story together, uses story herself to illustrate the resonance an engaging story can have. She tells the story of her father and John Legend among others, and shares her advice via stories of her own experiences as a career coach.  What story does is place your body of work:”…everything you create, contribute, affect, and impact. For individuals, it is the personal legacy you leave at the end of your life, including all the tangible and intangible things you have created” (Source) into a unique context.

Slim’s book is a great starting point for discovering how to tell your story, but you can also draw much inspiration from the remarkable examples of professional stories on Slideshare.net. One such story is Matt Henshaw’s “How to Rock the Perfect LinkedIn Profile”:

Henshaw’s deck is of course a beautiful example of clean, minimalist design. It’s also one of the best examples of a professional story I’ve seen since David Crandall’s “Anti-Resume Manifesto.” Henshaw tells the story of being “this close” to achieving his dream–being a professional musician–losing a major record contract, redefining himself as a college graduate and computer science sustainability research assistant (phew!), finding his way back to his passion, and articulating a successful plan to pursue this passion as career.

It’s so difficult to tell our own stories at times, especially through a visual medium. Finding the right way to begin a story that for us has very fuzzy beginnings can stop most of us from sharing that story with others (no one tells you to think about how working at a local grocery store is the start of you becoming a teacher 20 years later). Matt’s deck is both inspirational and useful. It shows us that a story can compel viewers, contextualize “failure”, and that careful attention to every version of your story on the web can make a difference. If you want to maximize your competitive advantage, create a body of work and then tell your story.

 

 

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February: The Month of Unprecedented Growth

February has been an amazing month for myself, my significant other, my superteacher bff, and my superstar friend, writing center coordinator, freelance writer, and Younique consultant, Nicole Chapman. Nicole has been growing her body of work since graduating with her MFA in creating writing and earning the PROPS Excellence Award for outstanding service to Full Sail University. Her growth has expanded to her actualizing one of her natural talents and gifts–makeup and image consulting. Check out her teaching portfolio here for more information on this superconsultant and future superteacher. I am inspired to see someone talented take on the initiative of growing and evolving her skills!

I am participating in a tech networking event next month, Trucks and Tech III: Truckpocalypse. In preparation, I created business cards for myself and Jason, who is a freelance video editor. This has definitely helped me overcome my designer’s block and I am hard at work on my next Slideshare offering, based on my content development series.

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In designing my card, I used the colors and style in my TYS logo to help reinforce continuity in my brand.

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In designing the back, I wanted to convey the three core principles that drive my services as presentation consultant–developing ideas, designing visuals, and delivering an engaging message.

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I chose to keep the front of Jason’s card very simple; you’ll see why when you see the back of the card!

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I was inspired by other video editor business cards and chose the clapper as an iconic representative in designing this card.

I also met with David Morillo, a colleague, trainer, and former student, whose leadership presentation was positively incredible–a lovely blend of storytelling, audience engagement, and motivational ideas. Finally, Alex and I learned we will now be teaching a new set of students from the Sports Marketing Bachelor of Science.

There’s something in the air readers, something that has sparked an incredible amount of creative growth and opportunity in my network. I am taking a blogging break for the weekend to finish the PCP course reboot, participate in a 5k, and consult with my students, but I wondered if anyone else out there had felt or experience a similar spark of growth and opportunity?

Post-script, this week I heard from two of my heroines, Pamela Slim and Nancy Duarte. This is what my face looked like when I opened up my WordPress front page:

Photo on 2-27-14 at 1.32 PM

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Data Display of the Day: Climbing the Mountain of Resumes

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As the PCP reboot really takes off, Alex Rister and I are working on developing our weekly lessons/modules using a blend of video, image, and text-based instructional assets. Our ultimate goal for the reboot is to help our students understand what the true connection between effective presenting and professional success is. Why do they need to analyze their growth as professionals so far? How does this analysis better serve them when they present themselves online or in person? I truly believe that communicating and presenting your ideas to others is the most important skill a professional at any level can learn, especially when it comes to landing that dream job, keeping that dream job, and finding others with whom to collaborate. Today’s infographic can help our students take the project they create in Professional Communication and Presentation and present it in a way that is going to help them climb to the top of the resume mountain. This infographic, created by Kelly Services, provides job seekers with some excellent advice (some of which I really need to take on!). The connecting thread is audience awareness and adaptation. Just as in a strong presentation, a job seeker must adapt to his or her audience’s needs to better persuade and motivate them to act.

1. Make sure your resume aligns with your target company

Creating a different resume for each company may seem tedious, but it can make the difference between a resume that catches a recruiter’s eye and a resume that gets put in the virtual or physical trashcan.

2. Know your target company’s culture

As the infographic explains, in our age of connectivity and instant access to information, it’s easier than ever to conduct research on a company and adapt your approach to their needs.

3. Be confident and attentive

Those who are hiring you want to hire someone who is confidence in his or her abilities (not cocky!) and who is “present” during an interview. Show recruiters you are confident that you are not only a good fit for the job but also that you are confident in your definition of what it means to be a professional.

4. Don’t forget to say thank you

Whether via an email or phone call, show gratitude for the time your “audience” gave you.

What are your interview “must dos”? What did you do to land that dream job?

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Professional Communication and Presentation Reboot: Challenges

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This month marks my first break from both campus and online teaching since October. This is usually a time for me to review my approach to teaching the campus and online iterations of Professional Communication and Presentation. In addition to teaching, two of my most fulfilling roles as the lead instructor for this course are instructional designer and curriculum developer. The campus version of PCP changes a bit each month because I can note new areas for growth and opportunity, can consult with campus students on what works and what doesn’t work, and I can see live whether or not a lesson resonates with the students and translates into positive results. The online course, however, requires a bit more time, objective assessment, and analysis to adapt. This usually means that during the months I am not on campus I coordinate a major reboot of the overall structure, lessons, learning materials, and assignments based on the big challenges I noted for the previous six months or so of a previous iteration.

In analyzing the course this time around, I noted several challenges, opportunities, and action items. Alex Rister and I are firmly in the research and development phase. As she noted yesterday on Creating Communication, we’ve found a few amazing sources to draw from including Pamela Slim’s Body of Work. In this post, I’ll cover the big challenges this course faces now. Next, I’ll cover how I’m working to turn those challenges into opportunities, and finally share how the course will adapt and change over the next two months.

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Challenge #1: The lack of synchronous communication

As Alex discussed in her public speaking online series, teaching a presentation and communication class online is a real challenge. Everything we teach students is based on developing, designing, and delivering a presentation to a live audience. From audience analysis and slide design to “naked” delivery, the need for a live audience engaging with a presenter is ever present. Furthermore, students learn better when given an opportunity to present in the way they will likely do so in their everyday professional lives. However, we’ve been tasked with teaching this course online, despite the body of evidence that emphasizes the importance of synchronicity in online learner success (Source). So, it will be important in the next two months to bring in more instances of synchronicity. Currently, the PCP team uses iChat/Aim, Skype, and GoTo Meeting to add a synchronous element to the course, but we have not found the solution to helping students present synchronously to their classmates/teachers or to a physical audience.

Challenge #2: Understanding and engaging in presentation as a process

The biggest reason for the last reboot was to help alleviate a serious deficiency that we’ve managed to work on successfully in the face to face iteration of the course–students do not understand either the importance of or the need for engaging in a presentation process. While we talk about Nancy Duarte’s presentation ecosystem and structure the course so that students develop a portion (outline, slides, rehearsal) of their major project, an Ignite presentation, each week, many students still wait until the last minute to develop that piece and are often confused when their PCP instructor asks them to revise their outline and then implement that revision in the storyboard/design for the slides. Helping students understand how each piece fits together and also building in opportunities for them to take their time before submitting official drafts of their work is our second challenge in the reboot.

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This visualization of the presentation process by design firm Idea Transplant has been and will become an even stronger cornerstone of the course.

Challenge #3: Streamlining content

Perhaps it’s my background as a learner (I devour as much information as I can about a subject and love when there’s something new to learn and explore about a subject), but I can definitely recognize that both on campus and online I share too much information, which just leaves students feeling overwhelmed. Yes, it’s all great information, but if any of it is redundant, too complex, or repetitive, what’s the point in including it? So, our third challenge will be to reduce the number of lessons and assets to the most important and needed learning materials.

Challenge #4: Universalizing the experience for multiple degree programs

PCP began as a course offered only to music business and entertainment bachelor of science students. In the past five years, the course has expanded to other programs–computer animation, game art, game development, internet marketing, music production, media communications, and software development. While the course’s current structure, develop, design, and deliver, a persuasive speech is definitely general enough to encompass all of these programs, our students’ needs have changed. Whereas some students present informative and persuasive presentations on a regular basis to audiences, some students will only ever have to present their body of work to a potential employee or client. This leaves them wondering just how this skill will help them in the future. So, how do we communicate to students just how important and necessary strong professional presentation skills are? That’s our fourth challenge.

Challenge #5: Emphasizing the first P in Professional Communication and Presentation

Professionalism is important at my school, but it’s even more important in a class with the title Professional Communication and Presentation. Currently, the campus class devotes a week or so of in class time to the concept of a professional persona and communicating professional brand via a visual resume. However, this was removed in the last reboot of the online class to help streamline the approach and give students more time on the Ignite presentation. This means that our online students spend very little time if any truly exploring and practicing what it means to be a professional communicator. Our final challenge will be to refocus persuasion and presentation towards building professionalism.

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The Teaching Portfolio: Stretching those Design and Cognition Muscles

Recently, my department was tasked with a goal that left a few of us filled with a bit of anxiety (as it does most teachers when asked to take on this task)–our goal for the new year is to create or revise an online teaching portfolio. While most teachers are expected to have a completed portfolio they can call up at a moment’s notice, that portfolio is generally in print form and lacks the interactivity that is possible with today’s technology. So, I was excited to tackle this project and expand my already existing mini-portfolio to a full-fledged site with samples, student work, videos, images, and lesson plans. Here is the first draft of my site. It’s technically “live” though not being fully promoted as it is not complete.

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Note: I removed the curriculum section from the published site as it is not yet complete.

I had to ask and answer a few questions in developing this project: what is a teaching portfolio? Why do teachers need a teaching portfolio? What purpose does it serve new and experience teachers? What makes a good teaching portfolio?

What is a teaching portfolio?

While a resume or curriculum vitae is a part of a strong portfolio, it is not a replacement. Unlike a cv, a teaching portfolio focuses on communicating a teacher’s pedagogical vision, his or her range of expertise and experience, his or her teaching methods, the level of the teacher’s effectiveness at facilitating learning, and methods for assessing and improving teaching.

“While dissertation abstracts and research summaries document your expertise in research, the teaching portfolio documents your expertise in teaching.” (Source)

Why does a teacher need a teaching portfolio?

Teaching is a profession that requires lifelong practice, learning, and evolution. A teaching portfolio not only allows viewers to see how your approach has grown through experience, trial and error, and the use of metrics, but it also gives you as a teacher the opportunity to objectively consider how your experience and approach have aided you in achieving your goal–facilitating learning. The Teaching Center at Washington University in St. Louis gives a few more reasons for the use of portfolios:

A Teaching Portfolio is a useful tool that can help you (Source):

  • develop, clarify, and reflect on your teaching philosophy, methods, and approaches
  • present teaching credentials for hiring and promotion in an academic position
  • document professional development in teaching
  • identify areas for improvement
  • prepare for the interview process

So, a strong portfolio can help you land a job, a promotion, or related position within academia. It can also help you focus on the same kind of self-reflection and analysis you ask your students to engage in every day!

“Portfolios have much to offer the teaching profession,” writes Dr. Kenneth Wolf, of the University of Colorado. “When teachers carefully examine their own practices, those practices are likely to improve. The examples of accomplished practice that portfolios provide also can be studied and adapted for use in other classrooms.”  (Source)

What makes for a good teaching portfolio?

First of all, a teaching portfolio should be summative and selective, not broad and comprehensive. Instead of cramming every detail of one’s educational career into a portfolio, a teacher should instead selectively choose material that supports the main and universal component of a strong portfolio–a clear teaching philosophy. A teaching philosophy is in this case the big idea; it communicates who a teacher is as a professional and why he or she does what you does. The rest of the content fluctuates depending on a source, but in general, a strong teaching portfolio includes the following in addition to a philosophy:

  • Goals as an educator
  • Tracing of one’s development as an educator
  • Lesson plans and instructional methods
  • Methods of assessing student work and success
  • Course materials (syllabi, activities, assignments)
  • Student work examples
  • Evaluations from students, colleagues, and supervisors
  • Evidence of professional development
  • Video/photographic evidence of teaching

George David Clark of The Chronicle of Higher Education discusses three tips for a successful portfolio in his 2012 article on the subject. According to Clark, in developing a portfolio, a teacher should focus on organizing to minimize. By providing the target audience with a clear organizational structure and cutting content that doesn’t support that structure, a teacher can ensure that one clear message regarding theory and approach to instruction is being communicated. In addition, a strong teaching portfolio should clearly chart a teacher’s development and maturation as a professional.  Clark states that the “format of a teaching portfolio allows job seekers to connect the dots and even briefly describe the thought process that led them to try new things in the classroom.” Teachers can use the linear structure of a portfolio to help their audience understand where they’ve been and where they are going as educators. Finally, Clark suggests focusing on the student as a measurement of success. Something he suggested that I’d like to adapt is making reference to letters of recommendation students have written on behalf of a teacher that led to that student earning a position at a school or with a company. I’d love to get a sense from past students of how they use the skills they learned in class. These could be integrated while still maintaing the students’ privacy in an online portfolio.

You know I have to add a few design-based dos to this list…

  • Do create an easy to navigate site for your online portfolio
    • This is, I feel, the area I need the most work in–the way the information is in my head is not the way others might understand it.
  • Don’t use a template; remix existing design but make it your own
    • There’s nothing worse than an unoriginal teacher (ever have to teach someone else’s class–I don’t mean substitute necessarily here, but use someone else’s materials to reach something! So difficult!)….
    • …except for a teacher who steals. Be inspired by what you see more experienced web folks doing, but iterate that inspiration.
  • Use relevant visual support
    • While a print resume is by nature text-driven, you have the entire “mystery box” that is the web to draw from. Don’t rely on text only to communicate your message. Recall that text alone helps your audience retain far less information than text and image together (Source).
  • Make it interactive
    • Create a dynamic portfolio with text, audio, and visual to maximize your message.
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April’s Communication Goals

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Today in Professional Communication and Presentation, Alex led her students and me through an awesome exercise (and not just for the first day of class). Alex asked us to come up with three presentation/communication goals for this month’s class. She shared her goals with the class and also with her readers on Creating Communication. The students’ goals inspired me to choose three goals for the month of April. Here goes!

Goal #1: Launch an educator round table

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Two months ago, our Director of Liberal Studies and superwoman, Dr. Kim Murray, sent around a newsletter featuring some of our faculty’s current projects and work. Liberal Studies is a large school that houses six different departments, including mine, the English department. Our faculty don’t get much of a chance to collaborate with those outside of our immediate departments, though, unless we take the initiative to reach across departments. In the brief newsletter, I learned that our faculty were doing amazing things both in and out of the classroom. This inspired me to bring the idea of collaboration between the departments to  faculty and management. After a bit of planning and meeting, the first round table discussion is set to take place this month, with the English department being the first to take the reins in terms of choosing, presenting, and discussing our first topic, creating a teaching persona. I am taking a supporting and facilitating role in this initiative and I’m really enjoying the hustle of marketing, scheduling, and organizing this project.

Goal #2: Don’t let the lizard brain sabotage me

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While I’ve conquered and defeated the public-speaking/presenting lizard brain, I definitely feel much anxiety in other situations in which I feel either out of control or as if there’s a more perceived sense of judgment involved. The biggest one for me has to be the job interview. I believe that twice in the past, my nervousness, insecurity, and lack of polish during interviews have sabotaged my chances. I’ll be interviewing this Wednesday and am using a combination of Amy Cuddy’s power pose and in-depth audience analysis/prep to help me quiet the lizard within.

Goal #3: Post the simple design series on Tweak Your Slides

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Blogging is my bane but also my love. I am great at keeping up a schedule with teaching, gyming, and socializing, but I cannot seem to get the rhythm of the blog down. So, my challenge for this month is to post a six-part article series on design. I won’t put a specific date on this, but I will say, look for a brief introduction to the acronym SIMPLE in the next few days.

Do you set goals each day, week, or month? What are your goals for April?

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Superteaching: A decade in review, a decade in progress

As part of professional development for the English department, my colleagues and I have been tasked with revamping our CVs, creating a teaching portfolio, or developing a professional online presence. As I’ve worked on creating a portfolio and have a website, I, of course, began revamping the CV right away and am currently working on ways to maintain the traditional purpose and format but still make the document more rich than just 11 pages of fluff. The process of creating an extensive body of work has led to a bit of retrospection.

A Superteacher in reflective mode...where am I going? Where have I been? (Source: JD Hancock)

A Superteacher in reflective mode…where am I going? Where have I been? (Source: JD Hancock)

January marks the end of my tenth year of teaching at the college level. I began as a green composition instructor at the University of Central Florida. My first and only UCF class was overwhelming, nerve-wracking, exciting and ultimately rewarding, but I still wasn’t sold on this as my career. I resisted the common “Oh, are you going to teach with that?” question that often came after I stated my major was English. In my mind, there had to be something else I could do with this degree. I was both right and completely wrong.

Source: gumuz via Flickr

Source: gumuz via Flickr

I entered the world of editing, copywriting, and marketing eager to prove myself, to dive into my favorite activities: consulting, editing, revising, and proofing others’ work. I applied for every job I saw on Monster and Career Builder; I bought a suit, a red pen, and waited…and waited….finally, I realized no one would hire me! Why not? Not awesome enough at English? No. No experience with professional writing outside of academia? Yup. That was it. So, to gain some experience, I worked as marketing writer and editor for my step-father’s A/V rental company and did freelance work for a local design firm, Lapiz Design.

To make ends meet, I also picked up an instructional assistant/writing center consultant position with Valencia College (Valencia Community College at the time). A short time later, I was offered the opportunity to teach English composition. Being the completely broke and desperate post-grad, I took the class, thinking it would serve as a good source of income until my editing ship came in. What I didn’t realize right away (but learned by the end of that summer semester) was that this would be my calling, that the hours I spent creating transparencies of poems, hunting down vinyl recordings of Dylan Thomas, and coming up with ways to engage beyond the assigned textbook for my course, would lay down roots that are now so ingrained in who and what I am that I cannot imagine my life without teaching.

Source: Mr. T in DC

Source: Mr. T in DC via Flickr

I was offered a full-time contract at a smaller campus of Valencia College. My acceptance would mean five wonderful years at the Winter Park Campus of VC. It was here that I really found my way, a mentor in my department chair, and learned important lessons about classroom teaching, curriculum development, and community and college involvement. It was here that I also began a love affair with the community college (RIP) model. I absolutely thrived in an environment committed to learner-based methodologies and initiatives. I also learned the impact faculty, staff, and students can have on the quality of education the entire community receives.

After five years and a poor judgment call, I was adjuncting, teaching 7 classes per semester with little room for growth at a small campus, so I accepted a position at Full Sail University, where I’ve had the pleasure of further expanding my skills as teacher, presenter, course developer, and now presentation designer. Regardless of challenges (teaching for a for-profit university is at times a sharper learning curve than at a community college), I would not trade the most amazing opportunity of my professional career so far, teaching Professional Communication and Presentation. I have developed a love for new subjects, public speaking and presentation design, that infuse every aspect of my professional and personal life. I have become a crusader for beautiful slides and dynamic delivery.

The last ten years have yielded a body of work I am proud of, and a constantly re-stoked fire for learning and responsible, sustainable education that I cannot wait to share with others. In the past decade, I’ve:

  • Taught 5,500 students
  • Taught 20 different courses or versions of courses
  • Developed 11 different courses either independently or in collaboration with amazing teachers
  • Have attended 30 final project presentations
  • Authored and delivered 17 presentations
  • Sponsored three student organizations
  • Have been inspired by amazing teachers, among them, Christin Upshaw, Sophia Buggs, and Alex Rister
  • Have been mentored by two incredible humans, Kim Murray and Chris Borglum
  • Immersed myself in three new subjects, the most current being my absolute bliss and joy

The first ten years have been fruitful and productive, but I have a few more goals to accomplish in the coming decade. Among them:

  • Truly bring my blog up to speed
  • Work on the balance between mastery and failure in the online environment
  • Continue to seek out opportunities that are learner-centered
  • Earn an Ed.D. in teaching and curriculum or educational leadership
  • Move into instructional design and administration

So, final words/thoughts on my first ten years: I’ve only just found my groove. I am stoked for more!

Source: pwbaker via Flickr

Source: pwbaker via Flickr

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November’s Outstanding Visual Resume

In an effort to promote the benefits of the visual resume as a worthy project for professionals in any field to take on (remember, this doesn’t and shouldn’t replace an actual resume), I am going to showcase a super student visual resume example each month. This month’s selection comes from Nick Weymouth, a student in this month’s Professional Communication and Presentation course. Nick does an impeccable job of designing this deck, and he conveys his story and unique point of view as a professional.

As I work to refine this project in the course, which began as a self-reflection project on the student’s month-long journey into public speaking, I look to find ways to adapt the approach to different professions. I am cooking up a survey to help me answer some core questions about the practical usability and adaptability of the project. So far, a few questions to consider are:

What has the response to your visual resume been so far? Do you feel the project represents you? What is the best means of delivering a visual resume? How much is too much in a visual resume? Is a movie stronger than a deck of slides?

I leave you with Visualizing Resumes 2.0, a work in progress deck I use in a visual resume workshop for teachers.

Do you have a visual resume? If not, what would your visual resume include?

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Visualizing Resumes 2.0

In between writing irate blog posts about the nature of inspiration vs. imitation in visual design, grading, attending workshops, attending final project, and attempting a few hours of exercise and life, I’ve found the time to update my deck on Visual Resumes. I am very proud of this new draft, having added stronger typefaces, cleaner overall unity, and integration of quoted material. This deck also features examples from two former superstudents, Crysta Timmerman and Spencer House. Give them a bit of love and check out their awesome takes on the visual resume approach.

 

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