Tag Archives: visual resume

Where do we go from here? When presentations just go wrong.

Today was visual resume showcase day in Professional Communication and Presentation. I am happy to say that my students created lovely decks/visual stories that represented who they want to be as professionals and the steps they are taking to achieve those goals. Here are a few of my favorites:

I love Crystal’s sense of aesthetic and design; as a trained and capable artist and illustrator, Crystal created these visuals herself in the Adobe Creative suite, included many of her own works and images, and told a succinct story. My favorite is slide is number 7!

Mikayla did such a wonderful job of integrating her own images and using her own aesthetic to convey personality and passion for her chosen industry. Her entire look is cohesive, well structured, and engaging.

Andy is my favorite student this month, I cannot lie. His bravery and willingness to push past his anxieties about presenting make me smile. What I love about his visual resume is his use of personal imagery and storytelling. You can really see how he’s progressed from dreamy boy to dream maker.

Check out the rest of this month’s visual resume’s below

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(Source)

Now, on to the part of today that had me nearly in presentation teacher tears….out of 28 students, only a handful were prepared to effectively execute the other important part of this visual resume assignment, a brief presentation explaining their approach to the presentation (how they chose their brand mantra, how they chose their target audience, how they made their design decisions, and what the project overall has to say about them as professionals).

As I sat watching one presentation after another, many of which simply involved students reading the question and then answering each one, staring at their slides, fumbling through ideas, and closing with the dreaded phrase “that’s it”, I thought, “where did I go wrong?” Was it in focusing all class time on developing the project and not enough on what would actually be presented in class, the explanation of how the project came together? Was it in allowing students the option of showing their slides as they explained their project? Was it in not asking for an outline of their rationale speech before class? In speaking to students, despite explaining both in person and in writing that on presentation day they would not be presenting every slide of their visual resume but would instead present an explanation of their process and approach, the resounding answer was I didn’t know that’s what you wanted me to do, or I thought just answering the questions would be enough.

I feel discouraged as a teacher and know that this not working in execution is my fault. What I don’t know is how to go from here? Return to preparation? Move on to the next project? What would you do in this situation? How do I reinvigorate the spirit of learning and growth in my class?

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4 (but really 6) steps to creating a visual resume

This week in Professional Communication and Presentation, the focus is the visual resume, a project I developed several years ago after seeing my friend Christin’s Prezume. I am currently working on a revamp of mine to match the new teaching portfolio and teaching philosophy infographic I worked on last year and this year, and ran across this article from Ethos3’s Scott Schwertly titled “Four Steps to Creating a Visual Resume“. In it, Schwertly shares some tips (six in total) I will be sharing with my students tomorrow. Schwertly advises visual resume creators to remember the importance of that first slide; catching your audience’s attention with that first slide will help set you apart from the crowd and also provide sufficient visual stimulus that makes the audience want to know more. Empowered Presentations, a Honolulu-based presentation design firm tasks each of their associates with creating a visual resume that showcases the individual’s abilities and personality. The first slide of each EP visual resume establishes the tone and feel for the presentation and the presenter’s personality:

Another tip Schwertly shares with readers in this article is brand yourself. This to me is one of the most important lessons to learn about a strong visual resume (and a big area I’m working on in my new version). Consistency in design that communicates and conveys who you are to your audience is key to a strong visual resume. I love love love how David Crandall brands himself as the anti-cog superhero in his Anti-Resume Manifesto:

One final tip I’ll share with you from the article is “Ask for It.” A visual resume is your chance to let a prospective company or client know exactly why they should want to work with you. As Schwertly says, “you need to provide purpose and meaning behind your visual resume.” Not inviting the audience to contact you is akin to closing a presentation with “that’s it.” It simply tells the audience you’ve wasted their time and they can now go about doing something more important. Slideshare user Yuri Artibise ends his presentation with two simple ideas: 1. That’s my story; what’s yours and how can I help? and 2. Here’s how we can connect. This gives the presentation that sense of purpose it needs to propel it forward in the audience’s mind.

Have you built your visual resume yet? If not, Schwertly’s article is a great starting point. Check out the rest here!

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Eek! I actually have to tweak my resume!

Slideshare.net recently featured my latest deck, Tweak your Resume as a top presentation of the day. Thank you, Slideshare! I hope that this deck, even more so than some of my other recent additions, gets the conversation going full force on the subject of visual resumes.

A viewer, Lorne Marr, had this to say about the visual resume approach, which really got me thinking about the best way to disseminate and spread this message:

Recently, I’ve encountered several people who overdone their resume, making them look like supermen and superwomen with experiences and skills impossible for their age and past experiences, but the worst part was the arrogant tone in which it was written. But I agree with you that a resume has to have an answer to the most important question – why choose me?

So, as presenters, we must find a way to convey our unique perspectives but also avoid being dishonest about our experiences and abilities. I am planning on reviving my on site workshop for faculty and staff on this subject using the new deck I created along with other awesome examples, and in preparation for this, I have revisited my first visual resume and am fervently working on restructuring, reforming, and revising the first version.  So far, I’ve begun migrating visuals from my Superteacher Infographic into a traditional Keynote slide. I love the superteacher icon, and the colors I’ve chosen speak to who I am as a person and professional. In reorganizing my deck, I am taking a cue from the biographical structure used by Empowered Presentations in their visual resume series:

I love how much cohesion exists between this series of presentations, but I also love how each one communicates the story and vision of the presenter.

I was also inspired by Alex Rister’s visual resume as well as David Crandall’s Anti-resume Manifesto, both of which open with information that sets a tone or context for the specific person’s skills, qualities, and experiences.

Here are my first few slides. I’d love to get your feedback readers!

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Fresh Deck: Tweak Your Resume

Happy Monday! This week in Professional Communication and Presentation, we are talking advanced visual design and applying it to the visual resume project. In preparation, I’ve debuted my next deck and labor of love, Tweak Your Resume.

I am a big fan of the visual resume (though mine is definitely a work in progress), and have written about it before.

Tweak your Image: The Visual Resume Final Project

Be the Signal, Not the Noise: Develop a Visual Resume

Love the Visual Resume–Seriously!

November’s Outstanding Visual Resume

Visualizing Resumes 2.0

Have you added a visual element to your professional persona? What tools do you use to create a visually appealing resume/professional profile?

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My Teaching Philosophy: an Infographic

In preparation for our focus for Week 2, part 1 of PCP, I’ve cooked up an infographic add-on to my teaching portfolio. I used the colors I’d created for our Liberal Studies Round Table sessions and after much tweaking, I found a way to communicate my teaching philosophy/brand mantra, instructional design approach, teaching style, and leadership approach. I hope to show this as an alternative to what students can create using Keynote, and the basic building blocks of a strong deck or visualization: color, type, shape, and image/iconography.

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Have you been working on your professional persona? What did you choose as your medium?

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Data Display of the Day: Wealth On a Plane

I ran across this visualization from visual.ly, and it upset, enlightened, and intrigued me.

It truly speaks to the power of using relatable imagery paired with strong design, clear organization, and relevant statistics. It’s also an awesome example of progressive disclosure. I am still working on my unemployment slides for the Tweak your Resume debut, and I may have to abandon them for now, as I am far behind on my launch date for this deck and the stat is really being used for a small idea in a bigger presentation. I’ve now included some progressive disclosure; I am hoping it will move me in the right direction!
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Enjoy today’s Data Display!

 

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Slideshare of the Day: Advice for Graduates

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Reid Hoffman, co-founder of LinkedIn has written one of my new favorite books and produced two decks that have absolutely inspired me as we move into the second half of the new year. The Start Up of You explains how an entrepreneurial spirit and approach can help all professionals (even us teachers) grow and develop.

His second deck, “The Three Secrets of Highly Successful Graduates”, is a must share (and view) from teachers to students. It’s also inspired me to add a few bits of Hoffman insight to my latest deck, “Tweak Your Resume”. Check out the deck below:

Tweak Your Resume Preview

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I felt Hoffman’s discussion of what competitive advantage means fit right in with why a visual resume is so useful.

What are your assets, aspirations, and how do those fit in with what your industry wants and needs?

What are your assets, aspirations, and how do those fit in with what your industry wants and needs?

Finally, here is draft two of my unemployment slide. What do you think, Margaret?

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Slideshare of the Day: Start-up of You

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This week in Professional Communication and Presentation, we’ve been discussing the visual resume project. A visual resume can be a great addition to your online portfolio. As wel learned during yesterday’s mini-discussion, it can also be an amazing way to blend the print resume with the digital form, as Victor Petit does in his QR code visual resume:

QR CODE – Content-rich Resume from Victor petit on Vimeo.

But, before one can develop an amazing and unique approach to the visual resume (one benefit to the rise in this approach is the plethora of good examples out there, but a detriment is that it’s now a bit more difficult to set oneself apart), one must know what one wants to convey to the target audience of the visual resume, whether it is a client, company, or collaborator. Students often struggle the most with this aspect of resume building due to anxiety over perceived or actual inexperience. However, young people are not alone in this–all of us must deal with the anxiety of knowing just who and what we are as professionals. I am lucky enough to have a career that is also my bliss, but that doesn’t mean that just like my students, I don’t struggle with finding my place as a professional.

This is where Top Presentation of the Day, Start-up of You by Co-founder and Chairman of LinkedIn Reid Hoffman comes in. Having just uploaded a successful 110-slide presentation, I had to check out this mega deck–I am happy I did. I haven’t made enough use of LinkedIn, and after perusing this immersive deck, I don’t know why. This summary of the book Start-up of You poses a very simple idea–that all of us need to think like entrepreneurs–not just those who function in that same role. Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha firmly believe that our success as professionals depends on recapturing and maximizing entrepreneurship–of our own careers. I have added the book to my Nook list of reads, and you should too. But in the meantime, if you haven’t already, check out the excellent deck below:

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Sneak Peek: Tweak your Resume

One of my favorite parts of teaching visual design is the visual resume project. While my visual resume continues to be a source of frustration for me (I recently ditched the old one completely and started from scratch), I enjoy sharing what I’ve learned about this dynamic form of professional persona building. This afternoon, I will be holding a GoTo Training for my online students as they prepare to submit their visual resumes. In preparation, the students study among other resources, Jesse Dee’s Really Ugly Resumes, Emiland’s How I Landed a Job with Slideshare, and my deck, Visualizing Resumes.

For this session, I want to draw attention to the examples they already have on hand and take this opportunity to rework my original deck on visual resumes. So, I have developed a new set of slides for this mini-workshop that I hope to continue building on and developing. Here is a sneak peek of my new approach to teaching visual resumes, Tweak Your Resume:

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Update: I’ve made a few changes based on some critique. On my way!

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What are your thoughts? I am not sold on the color scheme so far, but I am enjoying the process of laying out my type in a different way!

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November’s Outstanding Visual Resume

In an effort to promote the benefits of the visual resume as a worthy project for professionals in any field to take on (remember, this doesn’t and shouldn’t replace an actual resume), I am going to showcase a super student visual resume example each month. This month’s selection comes from Nick Weymouth, a student in this month’s Professional Communication and Presentation course. Nick does an impeccable job of designing this deck, and he conveys his story and unique point of view as a professional.

As I work to refine this project in the course, which began as a self-reflection project on the student’s month-long journey into public speaking, I look to find ways to adapt the approach to different professions. I am cooking up a survey to help me answer some core questions about the practical usability and adaptability of the project. So far, a few questions to consider are:

What has the response to your visual resume been so far? Do you feel the project represents you? What is the best means of delivering a visual resume? How much is too much in a visual resume? Is a movie stronger than a deck of slides?

I leave you with Visualizing Resumes 2.0, a work in progress deck I use in a visual resume workshop for teachers.

Do you have a visual resume? If not, what would your visual resume include?

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