A superteacher’s perspective via What The Speak

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I’ve had teaching and superteaching on the brain for days now, and this week’s Creating Communication offerings only helped reinforce thoughts of all things pedagogy and superteaching. Alex Rister recently sat down with Bryan Kelly of What The Speak to share her insights on teaching presenting in the 21st century. If you know me, you know I am Alex’s “hype girl,” biggest fan, and superteacher bff. I am proud of her pursuit of her bliss, awesome communication, and am inspired by her work ethic and passion! As a superteacher, Alex shares with What the Speak viewers several important lessons about presenting in the 21st century:

1. Help students understand the importance of public speaking and effective communication from minute one

Whether she is teaching an introductory class or advanced class on presentation, Alex starts with why–she doesn’t throw her students into jargon and lecture. Instead, she gleans from them what matters about public speaking and engages them on a discussion how students can use these strong communication skills in every mode (online, in person, synchronous, asynchronous).

2. Understand your origins

Pamela Slim, in Body of Work, emphasizes that the first step to articulating your body of work and understanding how the diverse pieces of your life and experience fit in is to know your roots. In this podcast, Alex shares her roots with viewers and finds ways to thread her early experiences with her current passions and objectives.

3. The teachers who are memorable are the teachers who engage

Information doesn’t matter as much as inspiration. As a teacher, one of my biggest challenges and concerns is letting go of my responsibility to be the “mouthpiece for information.” Our job is not to spew information via lecture (though this is the stereotype of “teacher”); our job is to spark and facilitate learning–the student must guide and drive his or her own journey. Breaking out of the lecture model isn’t easy, but it is a necessary step in the journey towards better teaching and better presenting.

4. Great teachers ask questions and make changes

Tweaking is a way of life. It’s the practice of acknowledging challenges, pinpointing the sources of student problems, accepting your role in perpetuating problems, and then taking action that will create positive results for students. The best teachers look for the roots of a problem, find actionable solutions, put those solutions in practice, and then test those solutions against student performance.

Check out the rest of the interview here or by clicking the image above. If you haven’t check out Bryan’s podcast, you must start today; he speaks with all the top voices in presenting and communicating and brings you the insights of those who live, eat, and breathe public speaking!

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Data Display of the Day: How to choose the right job

The Professional Communication and Presentation reboot has entered the lesson-building phase; we’ve secured our new course textbook, developed assignments, and rubrics. Now, it’s time to craft lessons to help our students meet the objectives we’ve developed for the course. One of my primary tasks in creating lessons is drawing from and integrating strong sources related to our core outcomes. Today’s data display, courtesy of Daily Infographic and visual.ly, features a very important topic, how to find a job that will help you grow into your career. While this infographic features information you already think about when applying for a job, it puts the most important aspects that lead to career bliss first.

For me, the most of important of these are those that lead to a positive work environment–opportunities, people, and management. From my perspective, a strong leader develops his or her staff, creating worthwhile opportunities for growth, innovation, and fair acknowledgement of above and beyond effort. A strong leader further motivates those he or she leads to actualize their best selves. So, for me, when my students ask me how to choose a target market for their Professional Personal Project, my answer will be look to the leadership.

 

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What’s your key to a job that grows your body of work?

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Slideshare of the Day: 7 Rules for Writing Blog Posts That Get Read and Shared

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As a blogger, one of my main goals is gaining readership through meaningful and worthwhile effort. The blogs I love to read provide me with information I cannot find elsewhere or have conceptualized myself but not articulated.  This year, I committed myself to becoming that type of blogger. My first step was and is consistency–from what I’ve observed, blogging consistently at least three times per week not only grows the amount of relevant content I have to offer readers but also helps me continue to grow my skills as a writer. Blogging consistently has also helped me connect with other like minded professionals. So, consistency is important, but, even more important is relevance and attractiveness. Today’s Slideshare, “7 Rules for Writing Blog Posts That Get Read and Shared” created by author and blogger Michael Hyatt includes some excellent tips for determining the audience relevance of your posts and crafting blog posts that attract readership. Check out the full deck below; three tips I will implement in my next posts are: 1. focus on the reader, 2. create a powerful headline, and 3. make your posts easy to share.

1. Focus on the reader

Audience adaptation, relevance, and a focus on WIIFM (what’s in it for me?) are great guides to follow when creating any type of content. In class, we devote weeks to various forms of audience analysis–audience questions, an audience needs map, Nancy Duarte’s audience questions from Resonate, and audience interviews. But, I’ve not done the same type of in-depth audience research in my blog. To be frank, I’ve taken for granted that the subject is what drives readership, but what if my content isn’t tailored to the audience’s who most often draw inspiration from Tweak Your Slides? Hyatt’s advice is to create an audience survey, distribute it among readers, and then write a followup post with insights and observations. Creating this type of survey can help bloggers create content that is user-centered, not writer-centered.

2. Create a powerful headline

I am sure that by now you are familiar with the types of attention grabbing headlines created by sites like Upworthy and BuzzFeed. There’s something about these titles that draws the reader in and helps cut through the cacophony of social media feeds. Much of the success of sites like these comes from the genius of founders like Jonah Peretti, who devote years to studying the anatomy of a sticky idea.  BuzzFeed and Upworthy headlines are often the epitome of the Heath brothers’ sticky concept–attention grabbing, jarring, memorable. A blog post title similarly has to break through the noise to manifest as signal. Hyatt suggests three excellent strategies for blog posts titles that stick: first, create a numbered sequence headline (“Five ways to…”); second, create a provocative question headline (“Are you….”); thirdly, create a how to headline, especially since blog readers often want to learn a new facet of your core subject.

3. Make your posts easy to share

Though I tend to rely on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and WordPress to spread word of my posts for me, there are several other useful tools out there that can help you help others share your work. Hyatt introduces viewers to several tools, namely AddThis and ShareThis, that can increase shareability (whether it is other sharing your work or others reading more of your work). I particularly like the content recommendation tools available as they not only lead readers to other content related to a specific post but also allow you to link readers to other awesome blogs on the subject.

What are your tips for writing blog posts? Whose blogs are unbeatable for consistent, relevant, worthwhile content?

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Design Smarter: Learn to Generate Color

I will admit, color is one of my serious areas of growth when it comes to designing presentations. While I can manage to reasonably dress myself in suitable colors, the choosing of workable colors for a set of slides is something that takes me longer than any other part of the presentation process, especially if I choose to go it alone. This is why I appreciate the sites I’ll share with you today as well as the techniques I’ve learned from them in growing my design skills.  I’ll use the image below, courtesy of Mohamed Muha, for my examples.

Photo Credit: muha... via Compfight cc

Photo Credit: muha… via Compfight cc

First, experiment with the color wheel on Adobe’s Kuler

Adobe’s color generator, Kuler, is part of their Creative Cloud, a storehouse of tools creatives can use to collaborate, share, and create work. When I first discovered Kuler, I was intimidated–the site on first glance is for professional designers–folks who understand RGB, CMYK, Hex, and HSB values (not me at the time). However, Kuler’s user-friendly tools (creating a palette from an image, color rule options that allow users to choose from types of color schemes–analogous, monochromatic–without formal training, and the thousands of color palettes made available by Kuler’s community of users) quickly helped me create custom palettes that made sense both emotionally and aesthetically. Not sure where to start in Kuler? A great place is the create from image tool, which allows you to upload an image (ideally, one that communicates the emotional tone of your presentation) and create a color palette from that image.

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This is the “colorful palette” I created using Kuler’s image-based color generator.

Shifting to the color wheel option with the same base colors creates a new variety of options.

Shifting to the color wheel option with the same base colors creates a new variety of options.

Next, draw inspiration for capturing mood and tone from Design Seeds

So, Kuler’s algorithm does a great job of grabbing pleasing colors from an image, but as you will learn, it often misses the point when it comes to mood and tone. Learning to grow as a designer means immersing oneself in the processes that lead to design success. After a time, you may be called upon to create a scheme without the help of a generator, so learning a bit from a seasoned designer can only help you grow. Design Seeds, which is curated by Jessica Colaluca, a veteran designer and consultant who has worked with Ford, Timberland, and Reebok, is a fantastic starting point for color generation inspiration. Jessica’s site, Design Seeds, features hundreds of original color palettes organized by color value and theme. You can also gain some insight into her process by checking out the about section of Design Seeds. Her blog, Fresh Hues, features even more color palettes organized by color as well as Pinterest-inspired mood boards.

One of my favorite new design-seeds palettes--I love the vibrancy!

One of my favorite new design-seeds palettes–I love the vibrancy!

The best part of Design Seeds is Jessica’s process and her treatise in defense of true color generation. Her process may surprise you, but it works. First of all, Jessica begins by tracking color and design trends; she then creates a list of images and colors that align with those trending moods. Next, she purchases photos and modifies them to create precision color; she then imports the images into Illustrator and mixes each color swatch. Finally, she polishes her work and shares it with the world under a creative commons license via Design Seeds. What is impressive about her process is her sensitivity to mood. What she often finds with color generators is that they miss important colors that the human eye would naturally gravitate towards:

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Can you see how Kuler provides a starting point to creating strong color palettes, but that is all–sensitivity to mood, tone, trends, and design inspiration will take you further than a generator or color picker can. As Jessica asserts:

“The quality that a person has that makes them love color, is the same one which is critical in creating palettes.” -Jessica Colaluca

I’ll leave you with my first attempt at a custom palette–it’s based on color grabbing, but my focus was on mood and vibrancy. We may have much to learn in developing color skills, but with tools like Kuler and Design Seeds, both you and I can be well on our way to smarter design!

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Participation: Action Speaks Louder than Your Words

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One of the marks of an engaging, “naked” presenter is the ability to engage his or her audience in such a way that the audience retains, carries forward, and applies the speaker’s message. When an audience can move beyond passive absorption of information or even active visualization of an idea, that audience is more likely to not only remember the idea, but pass it along to others (whether it is through action, word of mouth, or influence). A message come alive in the audience’s hearts and minds creates that ripple effect speakers need to gain traction for their ideas.

There are many ways a speaker can achieve engagement and retention. Author Olivia Mitchell of Speaking About Presenting states that a speaker’s role is to nurture attention and transform it to engagement (Source). For Mitchell, attention is the passive reception of information; engagement is the active desire for more information. It’s active nature makes engagement “more valuable than attention” (Source). In the article, “4 ways to move people from attention to engagement,” Mitchell isolates four techniques that move an audience towards engagement:

1. Sell Your Presentation (show the audience what’s in it for them and appeal to audience needs)

2. Evoke curiosity (use the copywriter technique of “fascinations”, short ideas that tease an audience ala a magazine cover)

3. Be Bold (don’t be afraid of a little controversy)

4. Build Rapport (empathize with the audience and tune to their frequencies)

According to Dr. Nick Morgan, author of Public Words, audiences want an experience. They want to feel that they’ve been a part of something meaningful (Source). Audiences want to know you’ve taken the time to create a unique and authentic experience that differs from other similar experiences on your subject. For the majority of a speech, the audience is a passive passenger on a journey a speaker has carefully mapped out. However, as Dr. Morgan asserts, an audience is made up of people–flesh and blood bioelectric engines–audiences are “naturally active.  And if you’ve done your job right, they’re ready to give back.  More than that, they’re ready to get started implementing your ideas” (Source). To capitalize on this natural tendency to act, Dr. Morgan suggests giving the audience something to do beyond the cliche call to action:

“I’m talking about an actual, physical activity.  A modest one, but something real, concrete, and deliberate.

So, it seems that moving beyond words can help your audience not only retain information but can also tap into their natural tendency to act. This is the true power of an activity in a presentation. In Professional Communication and Presentation, I task my students with leading discussion for 5-10 minutes on a core topic for that day’s class. Each group chooses a discussion prompt, conducts research on the prompt, and delivers their perspective to the class. In the past, I gave students the option of developing either a discussion question or an activity to help the class apply the group’s idea to presenting. This month, though, I was curious to see if activity alone would yield different results in terms of audience retention of the concepts being discussed, so I nixed the discussion option, as Alex Rister did with her students. Overall, presentations are stronger, more memorable, and much more engaging.

Creating a strong activity is a subject for a different post, but all in all, the groups have moved their topics much closer to that action center by creating relevant activities that bring their perspectives to life. For instance, one group was tasked with discussing how to conduct strong research and what the difference is between credible information and unreliable information. They wanted us to understand that while the web has become our primary source of information and there is much information on the web that is relevant and worthwhile, much of the information we find on the web has been diluted and distorted from a primary source.

To bring this to life in the audience, they asked us to play the telephone game. One student was given a sentence to whisper into her neighbor’s ear; the neighbor then repeated the idea to the next student. The process was repeated until the last student, who then wrote what he had heard on the board. What the student wrote down contained a few of the elements of the original, but the specifics were lost, altered, or misrepresented. This brief activity helped the class see just how easy it is to get the wrong information on the web, where information is distorted, filtered, and amended the further it is away from the original source.

A well-developed, well-placed, and well-executed activity can be the key to true audience retention, internalization, and action. Consider how you can integrate activity in your next presentation. For a bit of inspiration, check out these 7 moments of audience participation from TED. My favorite is Jane McGonigal’s, whose game can literally give you 10 years of life!


 

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Slidesharer to Follow: Orsolya Nemes

This week’s Slidesharer to Follow is one of my favorite presentation all-starts, Orsolya Nemes. Orsolya first reached out to me several years ago as she was beginning her own journey as a professional presenter. She followed up that reach out by creating several excellent slideshares, which have been featured as “Top Presentation of the Day,” and a TEDxYouthBudapest talk based on her debut deck, “Generation Y.” Orsolya, who runs her own consulting agency, “Y Consulting,” shared the story of how effective presenting helped her communicate the Generation Y perspective in front of a group of young TEDsters. Check out her TEDx talk below as well as my favorite Orsolya deck. Check out all of her work here.

 

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Do you Alltop?

I ran across the site Alltop during my first month of teaching Professional Communication and Presentation as I was gathering a go to list of resources on presenting, communication, and presentation design. It was Alltop that introduced me to the work of Garr Reynolds, Dr. Nick Morgan, and Decker Communications. I recently joined the aggregation engine’s speaking section, speaking.alltop.com, and am proud to say that today,  a Tweak Your Slides post, “Design Smarter: find the best blend for text and image”, was one of the “Most Topular Stories” of the day.

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If you haven’t checked out Alltop, which was created to fill the “where is all the best stuff on the web?” void, you are missing out. The web is a big place, and simple Google searches don’t always yield results for the best and brightest the web has to offer on a plethora of subjects. Alltop takes some of the work out of searching for and curating quality sources of information. For bloggers, writers, students, and teachers, this is an invaluable service. I am proud to have earned the badge below. Go Alltop!

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Slideshare of the Day: 29 Design Resources That Work Miracles

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Today marks the end of my two month break from classroom teaching. I’ve been busy writing up lesson plans for the Professional Communication and Presentation course reboot, revising assignment for the coming month, and tweaking my core slidedecks. As I am always working on minor or major adjustments to my deliverables, I am always looking for new sources of design inspiration and know how. A Tweak Your Slides reader, Richard Garber, who writes Joyful Public Speaking, shared the Assertion-Evidence format created by Michael Alley with me yesterday, and today, while browsing the latest Slideshare offerings on design and presenting, I ran across today’s Slideshare, “29 Design Resources That Work Miracles” by SEO.com:

The deck begins with a brief rationale–visual content today is one of the most powerful marketing tools for individuals and companies alike. But, like any good tool, it must be used in the right way, and this means placing the focus on good design and using good design resources. I was surprised at how many of the resources listed were new to me. Several are sources I wish I’d had in creating particularly difficult decks in the past and several others are sources I cannot wait to try this coming month. Here are a few of my favorites:

For Design Inspiration:

Creattica: though I already use Pinterest to curate designs I am inspired by, the added value of Creattica is that the site’s offerings are voted on and only displays examples of a designer’s greatest work–it’s a great way to filter inspiration down to great design for someone who is not a formally-trained designer.

For Image Editing:

Pixlr: I am lucky enough to have the entire Adobe Illustrator suite on my employer-provided laptop, but on my personal mac, I am limited to photo editing tools inside of Keynote and PowerPoint. Thankfully, user-friendly photo editing services like Pixlr are here to help. Available as a full online editor, express editor, and mobile app Pixlr is an easy to use tool for the novice designer

For Patterns:

Subtle Patterns: this is my absolute favorite new source. Again, as I am now teaching myself to use the Adobe Creative suite with the help of Lynda.com, my skills in creating depth through texture and patterns are limited to what I can find on image sites like compfight.com, ColourLovers, or what I can create myself using slide design software. As soon as I opened Subtle Patterns, I fell in love. The site contains hundreds of patterns available for download as .pngs and also features a Photoshop plugin similar to Kuler‘s that allows you to access the patterns without visiting the site.

Check out these and the other 26 awesome resources by scrolling through today’s Slideshare of the Day!

 

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Design Smarter: Find the best blend for text and image

The picture superiority effect occurs when you combine visuals and text together to increase audience retention of your message. The picture superiority effect is what allows you to create one of Nancy Duarte’s STAR Moments, evocative visuals. Not every visual needs to utilize text; Lisa Kristine in her amazing TED talk uses no text on her images; using text over her haunting and beautiful images of human slaves would have diminished their impact. However, text, especially in stand-alone presentations can help enhance a slide, communicate a more impacting message, and add to that cohesive look we want from original slide decks.

There are a few ways to blend text and image together on a slide. What you do depends on what you want to accomplish, the nature of your image and the amount of text on your slide. Your choice depends on what your main focus is in displaying the word with the image. Are they equally important? Is one more important than another? Here are a few variations to get you started.Below, I’ll cover a few of the more common combinations I see from designers and students. There are several ways to combine a bit of text with an image. Here are a few variations to get you started.

One idea, one image with empty space

One way to combine an image with an idea is to look for an image that has empty space. Often, images that employ the rule of thirds  include enough space for text. You know there’s enough space when there is little to no overlap between image and text. In this example, the original image by Flickr user Photoco. was licensed for commercial use with adaptations or remixes allowed. I was able to fill the slide with the image (which was large enough to display without pixelation) and use the empty space to the left of the figure to add my idea.

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One idea, one image without empty space

In other situations, you might have a fairly busy image you’d like to use on your slide; there is no one specific detail in the image that is more important than another that must be visible as in the example above. So, you can use a few strategies to blend image and text. The first is to adjust the brightness and exposure of the original image and place one large word over the picture (fig. a); note that this works well with a typeface like Intro, but might not work well with a typeface that has a thinner weight. In the first two examples (fig. a, fig. b), I adjusted the brightness and exposure of the image. In the next, I added a shadow to differentiate the text from the background (fig. c). In the final example, I adjusted the opacity of the text (this sometimes improves readability) (fig. d). Notice that the color changes depending on the option.

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After tweaking colors, shadows, and image settings, I chose this variation:

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Now, let’s assume you want to use a font with a thinner weight, like District Pro. Notice that without a bit of help, the text here is difficult to read. This is where a supporting shape comes in. Placing a shape behind the text (as long as it doesn’t make an important element on the image impossible to see) can be an option when blending text and image. In the example below, I’ve used several shapes to emphasize the text.

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One quote, one image with empty space

So, what if you want to place a quote or a lengthier idea (keep words to a minimum on a slide; 5-8 words is enough) on a slide with an image? Your first and best bet is to seek out an image with empty space, like the one above. Using an image with empty space and a readable typeface will help you maximize the impact of the quote by providing simple, clean visual support.

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One quote, one image without empty space a quote

At times, it’s possible to place a quote on a slide that has is busier–again, as long as the quote does not interfere with important parts of the image. However, this is the option I would advise the least. Placing a quote on a slide with a busy image will increase your chances of creating noise and it could minimize signal. In the case below, the quote on the slide combined with the image creates noise.

 

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The solution here is to rearrange the image to fit the frame (fig. e), find an image that allows the blend to happen naturally (fig. f), or allow the quote to stand alone.

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These are only a few of the many ways to blend text and image together.Whatever your choice, it’s important to consider these three best practices when pairing text and image:

1. The picture superiority effect is maximized when text and image are blended.

2. Create the most seamless blend possible.

3. Keep signal high and noise low.

What are your go to strategies for maximizing the picture superiority effect?

 

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Want to Change your World? Present better!

Yesterday, I received a phone call from a current online student who works as a data analyst. She called to share her amazing news with me. After taking Professional Communication and Presentation this month and learning how to develop, design, and deliver a presentation inspired by the work of today’s presentation revolution leaders like Nancy Duarte, Garr Reynolds, TED, and the Heath brothers, she was inspired to create a cinematic presentation for her company. Her task was to inform and train others on new software being used. She’d previously shared with the class that her company was firmly in the “death by PowerPoint” abyss Andrew Dlugan describes on Six Minutes. Presentations were tedious, forgettable, pointless, and sterile. But, for this student, being aware of these revolutionary ideas made it impossible for her to create yet another boring presentation.

Instead, she created a well-structured, well-designed presentation, and she delivered that presentation in a way that was natural and engaging. The results were remarkable. One attendee commented that in 20 years with this company, it was the first time he had felt engaged during a presentation. The student has been asked to visit other offices, present the information to the rest of the company’s employees, and even conduct future webinars based on her presentation. Not only was this student’s world changed by a strong presentation, but she has begun the great work of revolutionizing a company’s communication culture. This is not something that happened by accident or because the student was inherently already a strong presenter. A world-changing moment like this takes preparation, practice, contemplation, and a true empathy for a target audience.

If your ideas matter–if your business plans, your research results, or your cause are worth spreading–then design and presentation matter. –Garr Reynolds, Presentation Zen Design

Within my own institution, I often hear students and faculty complain about yet another boring presentation, another bullet-riddled death machine, another wasted hour. It’s clear that audiences don’t respond to the standard operating procedure; however, in speaking to those presenting the information, it’s clear that they perceive what makes for a strong presentation to be a matter of opinion or preference. I often hear, “students love my slides,” or “yeah, Chiara, that’s YOUR way of doing it, but we are not you,” or “Bullets work for me; people need this information!”, or “I don’t have time to put into presenting; I’m already good at presenting.” Internally, sometimes I feel frustrated, as if I am a small voice in a giant void called the status quo. But, as an eternal optimist, my response is to try to share with them the irrefutable work of brain scientists like John Medina, the Zen philosophy of contemplation before action created by Garr Reynolds, and the multitude of case studies, examples, and stories that prove that engaging in presenting as a process truly helps propel ideas forward and is the only way to reach an audience.

Where does a strong presentation’s power come from? In part, it is the clear experiential difference an audience feels when they participate in a well-developed presentation. But, more than this, a well-designed presentation harnesses the power each and every one of us has to connect with another person, be inspired by an idea, and find ways to actualize that idea. As Nancy Duarte says, “Presentations create a catalyst for meaningful change by using human contact in a way that no other medium can” (Source). I am not talking about opinion–this perspective is designed to tap into what appeals to people, how people think, and what leads people to internalizing an idea. Creating yet another poorly prepared, cookie cutter, boring presentation squanders that power in each of us to be a catalyst for change.

Your idea becomes alive when it is adopted by another person, then another, and another, until it reaches a tipping point and eventually obtains a groundswell of support. –Nancy Duarte, Resonate

It cannot be denied–proper preparation, thorough content development, design-centered thinking, and deliberate practice are the keys to a strong presentationand a strong presentation can change the world. If you want to change your world, you must present better!

 

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